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Using different encoder

11-13-2014, 02:58 AM
Post: #1
Using different encoder
Hi
I have an old MuscleLab encoder that I'd like to use instead of the encoder you sell. Since it also is a 5V quadrature encoder chronojump can see the signal. The problem is that the wire drum is of a different size and the sensor most likely have a different number of pulses/revolution.

I would like a setting that allows me to scale the encoder signal according to drum size and pulses/revolution. Is that possible to implement into a future version of the software?

//Knappen
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11-13-2014, 03:00 AM
Post: #2
RE: Using different encoder
(11-13-2014 02:58 AM)en_knapp Wrote:  Hi
I have an old MuscleLab encoder that I'd like to use instead of the encoder you sell. Since it also is a 5V quadrature encoder chronojump can see the signal. The problem is that the wire drum is of a different size and the sensor most likely have a different number of pulses/revolution.

I would like a setting that allows me to scale the encoder signal according to drum size and pulses/revolution. Is that possible to implement into a future version of the software?

//Knappen

Hello, we have no plans currently on support others encoders.
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11-14-2014, 10:59 PM
Post: #3
RE: Using different encoder
Do you have the chronopic for encoder? It is a bit different. If you have it you could capture with your encoder and, after that, manualy edit the signal file to adapt the numbre of pulses.
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11-17-2014, 07:31 PM
Post: #4
RE: Using different encoder
(11-14-2014 10:59 PM)xavier.padulles Wrote:  Do you have the chronopic for encoder? It is a bit different. If you have it you could capture with your encoder and, after that, manualy edit the signal file to adapt the numbre of pulses.

I have the chronopic and it's working fine with both encoders, except the signal from the MuscleLab encoder. The reason for using the other encoder is mostly the better shape and not needing a magnetic surface. It also have less resistance and inertia.

I figured I could manually edit the signal but that takes away the advantage of the fine software chronojump is.is. I'll just have to hope that there will be a function for scaling the signal in the future.

Thanks

//Knappen
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11-17-2014, 09:20 PM
Post: #5
RE: Using different encoder
The resistance in our encoder is larger than the MuscleLab one becouse we found that in rapid movements it was necessary to have a better spring. If not, the encoder didn't retuned in time and get loose after the returning phase of the wire.

Because of the more accurate measurements of our encoder it has a greater inertia, but it is compensated with the stronger mechanism to make it return.

In a quick measurement our encoder makes a force equivalent to 350 grams, if you want you can add this weight as external load to have a more accurate measurements.

If you don't have a magnetic surface to avoid the movement of the encoder, you can always put a weight above it.
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11-18-2014, 07:15 PM
Post: #6
RE: Using different encoder
(11-17-2014 09:20 PM)xavier.padulles Wrote:  The resistance in our encoder is larger than the MuscleLab one becouse we found that in rapid movements it was necessary to have a better spring. If not, the encoder didn't retuned in time and get loose after the returning phase of the wire.

Because of the more accurate measurements of our encoder it has a greater inertia, but it is compensated with the stronger mechanism to make it return.

In a quick measurement our encoder makes a force equivalent to 350 grams, if you want you can add this weight as external load to have a more accurate measurements.

If you don't have a magnetic surface to avoid the movement of the encoder, you can always put a weight above it.

Hi Xavier
Thanks for your reply. It's interesting that you have a total opposite experience of the two encoders than I have. My experience is that the Hontko-encoder jumps the drum in fast movements (I've had to fix it twice) because of the higher inertia and therefore have exactly the problem you describe in the musclelab-encoder. It have only happened once in the MuscleLab-encoder. To be fair I don't think it would happen in any test we perform here but my experience is that the musclelab-encoder is the better one in both form, function and in the way it's constructed.

Just my two cents, but that is why I want to use it instead. The hontko-encoder is definitely good enough by a good margin so I don't mind using it especially now that I have a detachable cable between it and the chronopic. An as you said in your firs post, I can still use the musclelab-encoder and do the math manually instead.

//Knappen
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